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Healthcare, Teamwork and more! New newsletter out

For those of you in the healthcare field, or worried about healthcare (and who isn’t these days?), you might want to have a look at my latest newsletter, which summarizes some of the themes that I see colleagues and clients wrestling with in that field. It also summarizes some of the outcomes of a team effectiveness workshop that I ran last month, which features the results of some of the... read more »

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Beyond Innovation Theater with Steve Blank and Brian Murray

If you couldn’t be there in person for our January 10, 2017 Columbia Entrepreneurship event, here is the video reprise.  It was an amazing conversation and a standing room only crowd!  Have a look and let me know what you think. read more »

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Failure can be your friend – if it’s intelligent

Just out, a short video primer on how you can decrease the fear and increase the learning from failure by practicing the art of intelligent failure. Click here to view. read more »

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Innovation and Jobs-to-be-Done discussed in my latest newsletter

My latest newsletter offers observations and ideas that were discussed at two CEO Summits sponsored by Innosight and featuring keynotes by Clayton Christensen and myself.   We discussed Clay’s terrific new book, Competing Against Luck, some of my ideas regarding the management of portfolios of innovation and how to tackle innovation challenges generally. Have a look if you are interested – and I welcome comments and feedback! read more »

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Clearing the space for growth-on disengagement, transformation and reinvestment

With September just ahead of us, in my August newsletter I touch on why disengagement from exhausted advantages is important for renewal, share the story of Target’s transformation from a traditional department store to the “Tar-zhey” many of us enjoy today, and reflect on research that suggests that dividends and share repurchases are essentially slow-motion liquidation moves. Now about those closets I need to clean out ahead of the new school... read more »

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Globalization is like migration, except nobody goes anywhere

This insightful article by my colleague Joseph Stiglitz is short and incredibly thought-provoking.  In it, he argues that globalization essentially pits the lower-skilled workers of the world against each other, having the same effect as though lower-paid workers migrated in mass numbers to wealthier countries.  The economic effect is to reduce wages of unskilled workers to a lowest-common-denominator. It is eye opening, as for decades now we have been taught that globalization... read more »

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Advice for corporate innovators from a recent mach49 event

My latest Fortune column addresses the perennial problem that we get ourselves into when we are acting on assumptions, but presume we know what we are doing.  You will find the link here. read more »

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Nancy McKinstry, Wolters Kluwer CEO, shares her experiences

It was fantastic to have Nancy McKinstry join us on the Barnard College campus for the inaugural run of our Women in Leadership program.  You can find an overview of her accomplishments at promoting women leaders here. read more »

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Fun interview in the Australian

While I was in Australia earlier this month, I had the opportunity to join The Australian for a neat video interview.  We talked about the end of competitive advantage, the role of power in organizations, and the importance of networking. read more »

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Sounds Like the Return of Ron Johnson

Interesting to read that Land’s End – the middle of the market retailer – is now being led by CEO with upscale fashion aspirations.  She prefers New York to the Dodgeville, Wisconsin headquarters, wants to move the brand upscale and refers to some of the company’s traditional offerings as “ugly.” Lands End is up against the same phenomena that have bedeviled J. C. Penney’s and other middle market retailers.  But... read more »

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The Time is Ripe to Revisit Women in Leadership

These days, I’m spending a lot of time on matters pertaining to women in leadership.  If you’d like to get an overview of some of the research and the remedies that can be offered, check out this free webinar. read more »

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The perils of an incomplete change process

Some people really do change the world.  But all around us, we see evidence of change efforts that began with great promise but ended badly.  In a recent New York Times column, Tom Friedman speculated on the effects of digital communications on simultaneously facilitating the ability of social movements to ignite, but hampering participants’ capability to form lasting new structures that replace the old ones.  I recently walked through a... read more »

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Now in development: Mastering Corporate Entrepreneurship On-Line

What if you could take teams of people or individual contributors with an innovation mandate and have them go through a state of the art, hands-on and very applied journey through the essence of innovation in the convenience of an on-line format? Part executive development program, part coaching program and part real-time learning, the vision for Columbia’s new Mastering Corporate Entrepreneurship Course is just that. It’s been a huge project... read more »

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Porter and McGrath on the same program at the Dong-A Business forum in Korea

I’m often asked whether there is any debate between Michael E. Porter and myself, since he is so strongly associated with the concept of sustainable competitive advantage. So I was wondering whether it would come up when both of us landed on the same program in Korea, the Dong-A Business forum. It didn’t. For the record, I should say that I have deep respect for Porter’s ideas and for the... read more »

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We were poor, but we didn’t know it – new transparency at #GPDF14

A topic of discussion at the Global Peter Drucker Forum last week was the effect that widespread digital information has on less well-off people’s views of their own situations. In the past, it was possible for people to remain ignorant of how the other half lived, because the information was not readily available. Today, ubiquitous messages on mobile phones, easy access to social media and ready-at-hand information from search engines... read more »

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