Join Rita's Mailing List!

News Archives

The “Consumption Chain” Solution to Differentiation That Lasts (The Build Network post)

You can’t prevent your business model from eroding. But you can build a company that’s capable of managing business-model transitions. One way to do that, says Columbia Business School professor Rita Gunther McGrath, is to develop the habit of thinking creatively about differentiation. McGrath first espoused this theory in her classic Harvard Business Review article, Discovering New Points of Differentiation, which she coauthored with Ian C. MacMillan in 1997. McGrath... read more »

Filed in:

Rediscovering the importance of institutions - “Why Nations Fail”

Tom Friedman had a fascinating column in Sunday's New York Times on the book "Why Nations Fail."  The main thesis of the book is that institutions that promote greater access to economic activity and that are associated with greater income equality also are good for the nations that sponsor them.  I was rather struck by this notion, as it is almost the same thesis that William Baumol suggests are associated with the... read more »

Filed in:

Harvard Business Press names Rita McGrath as one of “Masters of Innovation”

Scott Anthony has chosen 12 Masters of Innovation and presented them in alphabetical order. Rita McGrath is the only woman named, and is included with such well-known names as Thomas Alva Edison. To read about all the Masters, click here. To read about Rita McGrath, click here. read more »

Filed in:

FastCompany cites Rita McGrath

In a FastCompany post relating to The Little Black Book of Innovation by Scott Anthony, Rita McGrath’s writings are also cited: “There’s much more to say about the topic of testing, and the writings of Rita McGrath, Peter Sims, Steve Blank, and Eric Ries are replete with practical tips. To read the entire post, click here. read more »

Filed in:

Marketing Profs compliments Rita McGrath’s Posts!

[The writer] “regularly seek[s] out the unmistakable voices of three bloggers at Harvard Business Review: Rita McGrath writes like a favorite professor; Bill Taylor is the sage mentor; and Scott Anthony is the forward-thinking colleague. I value their unique sensibilities and communication styles, and could easily identify who wrote what if their bylines suddenly vanished. To read the entire post, click here. read more »

Filed in:

Harvard Business Review article cited in China

China.org.cn has cited Rita McGrath’s recent HBR article: Steady, predictable growth is what every large company strives for. However, how many companies with a market capitalization of at least US$1 billion achieved steady and predictable growth over a ten year period? Harvard Business Review has recently published research findings of Rita Gunther McGrath, associate professor of management at the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and her fellows, on corporate... read more »

Filed in:

IT Business Edge cites Rita McGrath

In an article addressing Pay Still a Basic Issue in Temp Marketplace at IT Business Edge quoted Rita McGrath’s post at Harvard Business Review: …writer Rita McGrath makes the point that many “regular” jobs have serious downsides and this new way of thinking has some upsides. One of the commenters mentioned this a way to provide work for stay-at-home parents, military spouses and others. McGrath wrote: “Many of the assumptions... read more »

Filed in:

Rita McGrath quoted in Human Resource Executive Online

In a post addressing the issue of flattened organizations, Rita McGrath is quoted: “When you increase the span of control for each manager, you’re giving each employee that much more leverage over the company,” she says. Flattened organizations can also have many managers who haven’t been properly “seasoned” in the ways of doing business, says McGrath. “A lot of managerial roles served as development functions — there was a reason... read more »

Filed in:

Rita McGrath cited in Business2Community blog

Recent research from the Columbia Business School concludes that fewer than 1% of large, publicly-traded companies deliver consistent growth over time. In fact, only 8% of nearly 5,000 companies studied achieved five percent growth or better two years running, and only 4% of companies managed the feat for five consecutive years. Sadly, a paltry ten (10) companies achieved growth of 5% or better for a decade. How do the “growth... read more »

Filed in:

Lightsquared and dirty rotten cheaters!

At Columbia's School of Engineering, I was very pleased to attend the Armstrong lecture given by Dr. Irwin Mark Jacobs.  He gave a fascinating talk about Qualcomm's founding, how it emerged from a previous company called Linkabit and how he views technological progress.  It was both interesting and inspiring to hear from someone whose innovations have profoundly changed the world. Among the points he made during the Q&A portion of the... read more »

Filed in: ,

Cognizant Among Ten “Growth Outliers” That Have Shown Consistent Growth Over Ten Years

According to research published in Harvard Business Review about how many publicly traded companies with a market capitalization of at least US$1 billion have grown by at least 5% each year over the last ten years, Cognizant is among the ten companies—the “Growth Outliers” —that have shown steady, predictable growth over all of the last ten years. A total of 2,347 companies qualified for the research. Cognizant is also one... read more »

Filed in:

Krka ranks among the world’s elite companies with steady long-time growth

The results of the research conducted by a renowned business magazine Harvard Business Review ranked Krka Group among the ten elite companies in the world with stable annual growth between 1999 and 2009. The magazine states that big companies strive for stable and predictable growth, which is what investors prize above all else. However, the contrast between what investors expect and what the vast majority of companies deliver is considerable,... read more »

Filed in:

Tech powers and a harsh lesson in survival

A January 30, 2012 article by Financial Times on the subject quotes Rita McGrath: “Innovation needs to be treated as material and systematic, not an on-again-off-again process,” says Columbia Business School’s Ms McGrath. The vested interests inside corporations arrayed against disruptive change can be powerful. To read the entire article, click here. read more »

Filed in:

MSNBC quotes Rita McGrath re Kodak Chapter 11

MSNBC interviewed Rita McGrath about the Kodak Eastman Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing: “It’s really up in the air at the moment,” said Rita McGrath, a professor of management at Columbia Business School and an expert in company growth and innovation. “There was this last ditch, hail Mary effort to sell the patents to generate enough cash to keep the place from cratering. Now that that’s happened, it’s an opportunity for... read more »

Filed in:

Rita McGrath named one of the seven most disruptive thinkers of all time

CIO Insight named Rita McGrath as one of seven most disruptive thinkers of all time, acknowledging her co-introduction (with Professor Ian MacMillan) of the concept of “discovery-driven planning,” which encourages testing critical assumptions and adjusting plans based upon what is learned. To read the entire article, click here. read more »

Filed in: